LATEST
POPULAR
Lame satirical article labours point

satire_thumbnail_1.jpgA satirical article laboured the point yesterday, merely dragging out the headline for another 300 words, unconfirmed sources reported.

As often happens with these articles, a point was made in the second paragraph, then only repeated with a direct quote. "That often happens with these kinds of things. A point is made then a quote follows, only labouring the point further," satire expert Dr Unconvincing Pseudonopolous said yesterday.


A satirical article laboured the point yesterday, merely dragging out the headline for another 300 words, unconfirmed sources reported.

As often happens with these articles, a point was made in the second paragraph, then only repeated with a direct quote.

satirist_1.jpg

Pseudonopoulos, coincidentally resembling someone whose photo appears when you type "satirist" into Google images

"That often happens with these kinds of things. A point is made then a quote follows, only labouring the point further," satire expert Dr Unconvincing Pseudonopolous said yesterday.

This was common, said Dr Pseudonopolous, an academic who we will say comes from the University of Melbourne, in order to trick readers into believing the publication this article appears in is not Sydney-centric.

It was also common to whip out a study which was obviously made up and did not take the concept any further, Dr Pseudonopolous said.

"We have conducted a study showing that 62 per cent of satirical news items are moderately lame. Another 21 per cent are seriously lame."

In most cases the lameness related to dragging out a concept that was not particularly funny in the first place. In some other cases, the pathos was related to a poor idea which was extended well beyond its usefulness to the point where it was no longer particularly funny.

The article then went on to quote a variety of unconvincing genericand very anglo names, including James Worthington, Tom Smith, Jane Harrison and Alex Moore. And more unconfirmed sources, neighbours and locals.

Chaser editor Mr Bossy Boots then phoned to tell the author another 80 words were needed because another person failed to hand in an article they had promised, detailing how John Howard (aka Little Johnny Howard, an hilarious moniker) is a liar and Kim Beazley is fat.

"But not as fat as Amanda Vanstone, of course," the editor opined.

Opining, along with remarking, quipping and retorting, are activities which appear in 71 per cent of lame satirical articles. These same activies appear in approximately 0 per cent of real news stories.